Skin Cancer Check in Mt Gravatt

Living in Queensland, we have the highest rate of skin cancers in the world and so regular skin cancer checks are important. Fortunately, skin cancer checks can help with the prevention and early detection of skin cancers. Our doctors are skilled in skin examination, taking biopsies and the excision of skin lesions. On top of this, we can manage many skin cancers here at the practice without the need for referral elsewhere.

Skin Cancer Diagnosis & Treatment

If you haven’t had your skin checked lately, we suggest you book an appointment with Dr Paul Colbrook or Dr Brittany Wakefield  to perform a skin check.

You can check out more about skin cancer:

woman in sun needs skin check mt gravatt

Regular skin checks can help prevention of skin cancers

Am I at risk of Skin Cancer?

Living in Queensland means we have an increased risk of skin cancers and melanomas.

We develop more melanomas than any other country in the world. We also develop far more other types of skin cancers and at an earlier age.

This greatly increased risk comes from genetic and lifestyle factors:

• Sun exposure when young
• Sun burn – it can take just 10-15 mins to burn
• Fair skin – especially English, Irish, Scottish and other European skin colouring
• Outdoor sports and recreation – Swimming, Football, Netball, Cricket, Surfing , Fishing, Gardening, Bushwalking
• Outdoor occupations – Tradies, Police, Airport workers,
• Family members with skin cancers
• Family members with melanomas
• Having an increased number of moles
• Sun damaged skin
• Previous skin cancer or melanoma

Melanoma is the most commonly diagnosed cancer and is the second commonest cause of death in younger Australians.

2 in 3 Australians will be diagnosed with skin cancer by age 70.

Melanoma kills more people than road accidents.

If you notice any of the following, you should have a skin lesion or mole checked immediately:

  • Changes in a freckle or mole  for example, a change in size, shape, colour or surface texture
  • Moles that develop raised  areas
  • Moles that catch your eye because they look odd or different to other moles
  • The appearance of a new mole on normal skin that is growing.
  • Bleeding and ulceration that does not heal within 4-6 weeks. You may notice blood on a towel or clothing.
  • Tender moles or sores.
  • A pink lump that is raised and growing week to week

To get the most out of your sunscreen:

Many of us relax in winter, but many of us don’t realise that even in the cooler months the UV index is often above 3 – the level we need sun protection. On some days  it still gets up to to 13 (extreme). Checking the Bureau of Meteorology website is a great idea  – some dasy the extreme UV starts at 07:30 in the monrning.

  1. Cover  up as much as possible.
  2. Use one with SPF 50+
  3. Apply 1 heaped  teaspoon for each arm and leg, 1 for the front, 1 for the back and 1 for the face,ears and neck. This makes 7 teaspoons per full body application.
  4. Apply sunscreen 15 mins  before stepping into the sun as they take time to work.
  5. Re-apply every 2 hours or after swimming.
  6. Stay in the shade but still use plenty of sunscreen. Even even under gazebos, umbrellas and trees we are exposed to the reflected UV radiation. Even the best umbrella would only reduce the UV by half, so without sunscreen we are still at risk of burning.
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